Studies

Current Research Projects

Farm and fields
Eastern Washington

Engaging Regional Stakeholders in Community-Based Patient-Centered Cancer Outcomes Research (Co-Lead, Patient Center Outcomes Research Initiative)

It is critical for researchers to conduct collaborative, patient-centered CER in cancer care delivery and accelerate the translation of research findings into practice. However, engaging patient, provider and payer stakeholders in CER studies of cancer care delivery in community settings is challenging. The goal of this project is to translate our initial success with a previous engagement initiative into a sustained multi-stakeholder engagement infrastructure that effectively integrates stakeholders in patient-centered CER, particularly as applied to improving cancer care delivery in community settings.

Adaptation and Evaluation of an In‐person and eHealth Diet and Physical Activity Program for Rural Latino Cancer Survivors

In collaboration with community partners, this project will adapt Dr. Heather Greenlee’s existing Mi Vida Saludable (My Healthy Life) intervention to address the sociocultural (cultural, infrastructural, and logistical) needs of rural‐dwelling, primarily Mexican‐American, cancer survivors living in Yakima Valley and test the feasibility of the adapted intervention.[CRG1] 

Outreach Core, Co-Lead, U54 Partnership for the Advancement of Cancer Research: NMSU & Fred Hutch

This is part of a U54 grant partnership between Fred Hutch and New Mexico State University. The overall goal of the Outreach Core is to reduce the cancer health disparities found in the three regions of New Mexico and Washington state through community-academic partnerships, health education, community education, and partnership with health care providers. 

A Multilevel Approach to Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening in Rural Communities of the UW/FH Catchment Area

The overall goal of this bid and proposal application is to conduct a pilot study in conjunction with local medical organizations to disseminate and implement an evidence-based colorectal cancer screening initiative within two rural regions in the 13 counties of Northwest Washington state. 

Addressing Social Determinants of Health in Primary Care (Pilot Project #2, Co-Lead) U54 Partnership for the Advancement of Cancer Research: NMSU & Fred Hutch)

Current efforts to implement a Social Determinants of Health (SDH) screening tool in a New Mexico primary care practice in a primary care residency program that serves a high need population, offer a unique opportunity to examine the tool’s implementation process, consider methods of educating medical providers about use of the tool, and explore patient and physicians’ perceptions of the tool’s usefulness. Using multiple methods to ensure high scientific rigor, the project will gather the formative data needed to develop an educational intervention for medical providers on the use of SDH screening tools and knowledge about how to implement such tools in a clinical setting.

Determining Feasibility of Technology Based Cancer Support Among Rural Dwelling Latinos

The services associated with e-health can deliver significant benefits to regions that are otherwise isolated from critical health services and health education resources. While some studies have shown the benefits of using e-health to address disease in rural regions, few have involved rural Latinos. This study will conduct a community-level survey assessment to better understand use of technology among Latinos in Washington state’s Lower Yakima Valley, as well as one-on-one interviews to learn more about the needs and preferences for online interactions among the community.


Collaborations

Prevalence and Predictors of HPV Vaccine Uptake Among Urban and Rural Latinos in Yakima County 

Principal Investigator: Marian Neuhouser, Ph.D., R.D., Member and Cancer Prevention Program Head, Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutch

The goal of this proposal is to gather data on HPV vaccine series completion and on facilitators and barriers to uptake of HPV vaccination among rural, Latino residents of Washington state’s Lower Yakima Valley (LYV), which is a federally designated medically underserved region.

Increasing Rural Primary Care Clinics’ Capacity to Implement Evidence-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Programs

Principal Investigator: Parth Shah, PharmD, Ph.D., Assistant Member, Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutch

The overall objective of this proposal is to increase rural primary care practices’ capacity to implement Proactive Colorectal Cancer Screen (ProCRCScreen) a multi-component CRC screening program. We will achieve this objective by using a Community Engaged Research (CEnR) approach to engage four rural primary care clinics in Washington state.

Variations in Needs After Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis

Principal Investigator: Uli Boehmer, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Public Health, Boston University 

The goal of the proposed study is to examine the quality of life of CRC survivors of different sexual orientations, understand the factors that explain the quality of life in LGB and heterosexual survivors and determine unmet needs of LGB cancer survivors.  

Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers: An RCT

Principal Investigator: Jason A. Mendoza, M.D., M.P.H., Professor, School of Medicine, Pediatrics, University of Washington, Attending Physician, Seattle Children’s

Childhood obesity and lack of physical activity are important risk factors for adult obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and multiple cancers. This project involves 1) conducting a cluster RCT of the culturally adapted Fit 5 Kids curriculum to evaluate its efficacy in reducing screen time and excessive weight gain over a school year for Latino preschoolers and 2) examining mediators and moderators associated with reducing Latino preschoolers’ screen time.


Completed Research Projects

Pathways to Enhance Emotional Health in Cancer Survivorship (In partnership with Patti Migliore-Santiago, Ph.D., Washington State Department of Health)

Fear of recurrence, a sense of isolation, and difficulty adjusting to life’s “new normal” can induce distress among cancer survivors, but little research exists on this segment of the cancer continuum, and preparation for the potential emotional distress is not included in most survivorship care plans. This study aims to understand the perceptions from both the patient and the medical professional about their experience during the time of transition from cancer patient to cancer survivor.

SANA II: Sobrevivientes Apoyandose a Navegar Adelante (Survivors Helping Each Other Navigate Forward)

The SANA II Study aims to develop a Spanish-language support program based in Social-Cognitive Theory (SCT) for rural Hispanic survivors of female reproductive cancer and evaluate the resulting data using psychosocial and biological outcomes. Methods include interviews and focus groups, as well as support groups. The targeted population is post-treatment, Hispanic adult survivors of female reproductive cancers living in Lower Yakima Valley.

SANA III: Sobrevivientes Apoyandose a Navegar Adelante (Survivors Helping Each Other Navigate Forward)

The purpose of the SANA III Study is to develop a culturally-appropriate support program targeted to Hispanic cancer survivors and to conduct a program evaluation using an interdisciplinary biopsychosocial approach.
The methods include focus groups and support groups. The target population is post-treatment, Hispanic, adult cancer survivors living in King and Pierce Counties.

SANA IV: Sobrevivientes Apoyandose a Navegar Adelante (Survivors Helping Each Other Navigate Forward)

The SANA IV Study aims to develop a culturally-appropriately support program targeted to Latina breast cancer survivors and to conduct a program evaluation using an interdisciplinary biopsychosocial approach. Methods include interviews and focus groups, as well as support groups. The targeted population is post-treatment, Hispanic women whom survived breast cancer living in King and Pierce County.

STAR: Staying on Track After Recovery

The purpose of this study is to conduct a qualitative assessment to identify gaps (and successes) in the provision of information or services to African-American breast cancer survivors in King County.  This is being achieved through interviews and focus groups of African-Americans diagnosed with breast cancer, and several local oncologists and oncology social workers.