Lab Members

Nina Salama

Nina Salama

Title: Professor
Phone: 206.667.1540


Professor, Division of Human Biology
Professor, Public Health Sciences Division
Affiliate Professor, Basic Sciences Division
Affiliate  Professor, University of Washington Department of Microbiology

Jacob Frick

Jacob Frick

Title: Graduate Student, Microbiology Graduate Program

I am interested in how Helicobacter pylori adapts to the hostile and ever-changing environment of the host gastric epithelium. I use next-gen sequencing data to look at large, structural genetic polymorphisms that arise over chronic colonization. I characterize the functional effects of these polymorphisms using an array of molecular tools, proteomics, and microscopy.

Mark Guillotte

Mark Guillotte

Title: Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

I am investigating the innate immune response to H. pylori using both in vitro and in vivo models to better understand how infection with this pathogen leads to chronic inflammation.

Vessel sculpture and Arnold Building on Fred Hutch campus

Eli Le

Title: Research Technician

I am involved in projects that aim to understand the epidemiological impacts and genomic diversity of H. pylori using droplet digital PCR. I also help ensure that things run as smoothly as possible in the lab.

Valerie O'Brien

Valerie O'Brien

Title: Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

My research expertise is in chronic bacterial infections and their impact on the host. In the Salama lab I am using mouse models and human tissue samples to investigate the molecular mechanism(s) through which chronic Helicobacter pylori infection leads to the development of gastric cancer.

Vessel sculpture and Arnold Building on Fred Hutch campus

Armando Rodriguez

Title: Research Technician
Sophie Sichel

Sophie Sichel

Title: Graduate Student, Molecular Medicine and Mechanisms of Disease Program

I am investigating how a cytoskeletal protein in H. pylori helps the bacteria maintain its characteristic helical cell shape and how this shape promotes pathogenesis. To understand how this protein defines H. pylori’s helical cell shape I use bacterial genetics, multiple types of microscopy, and biochemical techniques. Additionally, I use 2D gastric organoid models to understand how modulating the shape of H. pylori impacts its ability to colonize the gastric epithelium and cause disease.

Vessel sculpture and Arnold Building on Fred Hutch campus

Jazmine Snow

Title: Graduate Student, Molecular & Cellular Biology